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Trump Clears the Way for a Huawei Ban

Phil Harvey
5/15/2019
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The president, via executive order, has given the Commerce Secretary the ability to ban the import of gear and services from companies that have close ties to foreign governments. This could be applied to any of the major telecoms equipment companies, but it is understood to be aimed at Huawei.

The executive order also gives the Commerce Secretary, in consultation with other agencies, the ability to ban damn near anything that he believes "poses an unacceptable risk to the national security of the United States or the security and safety of United States persons."

All that's required, according to the wording of the executive order, is belief. Not proof. Not evidence. Not prior action or sufficient motivation. Just believe whatever you like and you can ban whatever you like.

The point of this exercise is to avoid the disruption of US telecommunications or other infrastructure, according to the president's order. In the first sentence, Trump notes that this is ongoing as he said he's finding "that foreign adversaries are increasingly creating and exploiting vulnerabilities in information and communications technology and services..."

Huawei isn't mentioned in the executive order, but it's clearly aimed at giving the government the all clear to outright ban Huawei gear, as well as to ban the supplying of components and services to Huawei.

Phil Harvey, US Bureau Chief, Light Reading

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optical Mike
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optical Mike,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/17/2019 | 1:45:47 PM
Re: Comment from Huawei (via its US PR firm)
Huawei should have been banned years ago, their lack of business ethics and policy of outright theft of intellectual property to be passed off as their own is unparalleled. 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/16/2019 | 4:08:16 PM
Re: Comment from Huawei (via its US PR firm)
 

So, if I were in charge - I would ban comms imports from many countries.  The difference is that OSS systems are often on closed networks and harder to hack from the outside. Network equipment is much more vulnerable.  Phones (at least) will mostly only hack you.

The PLA had significant influence on the early days of Huawei and Huawei is charged directly with violating US law (see the CFO in Canada).  I personally place Huawei at a higher risk than pretty much everyone else.  The problem is that the CCP controls China and any Chinese company can NOT claim to be immune to influence by the CCP.  The number of horror stories recently - the Ugyghurs, Organ Harvesting, Falun Gong, Hong Kong - that is hard to see how one can believe that they are off limits.  

Can I prove that Huawei is in the pocket of the CCP and Chinese Intelligence?  No.  But I am 100% clear that the CCP and all of its arms make the rules.  Check out Chinese celebrities that dissapear (like the former head of Interpol) and see what you would do in their stead.

seven

 
Phil Harvey
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Phil Harvey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/16/2019 | 12:27:47 PM
Re: Comment from Huawei (via its US PR firm)
It's really odd that Trump didn't mention anything about the PRC. Do you think this extends to all phones made in China? And set-tops? And all the OSS/BSS software code written in Belarus? Latvia? Moldova? He really should have been more specific.

 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/16/2019 | 12:20:03 PM
Re: Comment from Huawei (via its US PR firm)
The reason that belief is all that is required is that the PRC is an enemy power as demonstrated by the multiple indictments of members of the government for hacking US government and corporations.

seven

 
Phil Harvey
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Phil Harvey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/16/2019 | 11:25:23 AM
Comment from Huawei (via its US PR firm)
Media Statement:

"Huawei is the unparalleled leader in 5G. We are ready and willing to engage with the US government and come up with effective measures to ensure product security. Restricting Huawei from doing business in the US will not make the US more secure or stronger; instead, this will only serve to limit the US to inferior yet more expensive alternatives, leaving the US lagging behind in 5G deployment, and eventually harming the interests of US companies and consumers. In addition, unreasonable restrictions will infringe upon Huawei's rights and raise other serious legal issues."
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